Youth participation vital in shaping country’s future, says Zahid

Mar 26, 2017

Youth participation plays an important role in shaping the country’s future in line with the National Transformation (TN50) policy, says Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi.

Ahmad Zahid, who is also Home Minister, said he was very positive that with the right attitude and preparation, the transformation which seemed impossible at first could become a reality.

“Only through dedication and cooperation, we can overcome and conquer our own future.

“Input from youth is certainly crucial as they are the eventual owners and beneficiaries of the plan come 2050,” he said when opening the Asia Urban Youth Assembly (AUYA) in conjunction with 17th International Melaka Twin Cities Convention 2017.

AUYA is an international conference that provides a platform for Asia’s youth with the opportunity to deliberate and discuss issues that are significant for young people to make relevant contributions to the new urban agenda of the United Nations (UN) sustai nable development goals (SDG).

Ahmad Zahid said three global trends would influence and challenge the future that youth should be better prepared with the right skills and mindset.

“The first is the rich are ageing while the poor are not, shifting and climate change environment and health issues that demand attention and I must add, a lot of attention.

“These trends will converge at an unprecendented pace that will make governing and cooperation harder and change in the nature of power fundamentally altering the global landscape.”

He said the second was the shifting global economy where weak economic growth would persist in the near term.

“The major economies will be confronted with shrinking workforce and diminishing productivity gains while they are recovering from the 2008-2009 financial crisis that left them with high debt, weak demand and doubts about globalisation.

“During the next five years, the global economy will continue to struggle to resume growth as the world’s major economies slowly recover from the 2008-2009 crisis and work through a sharp increase in public-sector debt,” he said.

Ahmad Zahid said the third global trend was climate change environment and health issues that demanded attention.

“A range of global hazards pose imminent and longer-term threats that will require collective action to address even as cooperation becomes harder,” he said. –Bernama