Ex-judge urges for normal attire during remand proceedings

 |Aug 23, 2017
Datuk Mohd Noor Abdullah says from the people’s perspective, the image and reputation of an individual or detainee should be protected so as not to be undermined by the public while the authorities carry out their duties according to the law.

KUALA LUMPUR: The use of lock-up shirts is permissible and subject to the law but should be refined in the future to be fair to the detainees being investigated, says Anti-Corruption Advisory Board member Datuk Mohd Noor Abdullah.

He said from the people’s perspective, the image and reputation of an individual or detainee should be protected so as not to be undermined by the public while the authorities carry out their duties according to the law.

“A person is innocent until proven guilty.

“Therefore, the action of bringing detainees to see a magistrate for remand proceedings should be given proper discretion.

“The use of lock-up shirts is subject to the ‘Lock-Up Regulations’ which a detainee should adhere to.

“But during the process of obtaining a remand order, he is allowed to wear normal clothes because he is not yet convicted,” he told reporters at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Academy here yesterday.

Noor, who is also former Court of Appeal judge, said this in response to polemics over the use of lock-up shirts involving former chairman of Felda Global Ventures Holding Berhad (FGV) Tan Sri Mohd Isa Abdul Samad and Penang state executive councillor Phee Boon Poh recently.

“What’s done is done. Do not do that again,” he said.

Noor said the use of the orange lock-up shirts and handcuffs could be imposed when the detainee failed to adhere to instructions or behaved violently to the extent of jeopardising the investigation process.

On Aug 15, the former FGV chairman was detained at the Putrajaya MACC office to assist in investigations into the purchase of two hotels by Felda Investment Corporation (FIC).

Phee, on the other hand, was arrested on Aug 11 to assist in investigations into the case of a factory operating illegally in Sungai Lembu, Bukit Mertajam for the past 10 years. – Bernama

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