Lim Kit Siang’s formula to make Anwar PM

 |Apr 10, 2017

 

Lim Kit Siang wants to make Anwar the PM, but how?

How many cons does Lim Kit Siang hope to play?

An even more important question would be how come the Chinese are swallowing these cons after cons hook line and sinker?

Take the issue of Anwar Ibrahim as the next prime minister as another example of Kit Siang’s cons.

Kit Siang says he supports Anwar as prime minister in the event Pakatan Harapan wins the next general election.

That is like promising he will share half his winnings if he wins the lottery.

It is easy to make such promises because you know you are never going to win the lottery simply because you have never bought any lottery in your entire life.

All Kit Siang wants is to retain Penang (which is why he is moving to Penang for the next general election).

He knows that this is all DAP can expect.

With less than 50 parliament seats (or maybe just 45), DAP is never going to be able to form the next federal government.

Hence Anwar Ibrahim is never going to become prime minister.

So what harm is there in promising Anwar the prime minister’s post knowing it is never going to happen?

Pakatan Harapan needs to least 115 parliament seats to form the next federal government, to be safe, although a simple majority is only 112.

If DAP wins, say, 45 seats, then the rest (such as PKR, Amanah, Pribumi and Parti Bebas Rasuah) would need to win 70 seats.

Kit Siang knows this is never going happen because that would mean Sabah and Sarawak (which have 57 seats) would have to fall while Umno must be reduced to just 80 seats.

So, knowing that they do not need to make Anwar the prime minister, Kit Siang promises that if Pakatan Harapan wins the next general election Anwar would become the prime minister.

But he never explains how that was going to happen.

He does not need to explain because he knew it will never happen.

So, again, Kit Siang is conning the voters.

Say Pakatan Harapan wins 115 seats in the next general election.

What are they then going to do?

Are they going to send 100 people armed with guns to the Sungai Buloh Prison and demand that they release Anwar and then bring him to His Majesty the Agong to get sworn in as prime minister?

But then, to become prime minister, you must first be elected as a Member of Parliament.

So how is that going to happen?

Are they going to do another ‘Kajang Move’ and ask one of the PKR MP to resign so that a by-election can be held and then Anwar will contest that by-election (which, of course, he must win before he can become prime minister).

But then Anwar will be barred from contesting the election until five years after he serves his sentence, which means at the very earliest in 2025.

So, if the general election is held this year, Anwar has to wait another eight years to contest the by-election.

That would mean one more general election after the 2017-2018 general election will need to be held before the by-election for Anwar to contest can he held.

But then, to become prime minister, you must first be elected as a MP.

So how is that going to happen?

Are they going to do another ‘Kajang Move’ and ask one of the PKR MP to resign so that a by-election can be held and then Anwar will contest that by-election (which, of course, he must win before he can become prime minister).

But then Anwar will be barred from contesting the election until five years after he serves his sentence, which means at the very earliest in 2025.

So, if the general election is held this year, Anwar has to wait another eight years to contest the by-election.

That would mean one more general election after the 2017-2018 general election will need to be held before the by-election for Anwar to contest can he held.

So, in the meantime, for eight years, Anwar cannot become the prime minister.

Hence what happens in the meantime during those eight years?

Does someone else become a temporary prime minister who warms the seat for the next eight years while we wait for Anwar to take over? – Malaysia Today

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Raja Petra Kamarudin or RPK, cousin to the Selangor Sultan, is one of Malaysia's earliest online 'citizen journalists'. He started his website in 1995 before the internet 'explosion' triggered by the Reformasi movement in September 1998. Malaysia Today was launched as a blog in August 2004 and is one of the few pioneer blogs still active and posting articles on a daily basis 24-7. RPK, 66 years old, has been writing since 1990.