Bersih has failed

 |Oct 11, 2016

 

Bersih seems no longer a free and fair election watchdog. It has now become an anti-government hostile political party.
Bersih seems no longer a free and fair election watchdog. It has now become an anti-government hostile political party.

This is the problem with Bersih.

If they had spent more time on the job they are meant to do instead of organising Free-Anwar rallies and Anti-Najib demonstrations, this might not have happened.

Bersih did not have its eye on the ball and now they have lost the game.

I suppose that is what happens when one loses the plot, one loses the game as well.

Now Bersih wants to go to court.

Bersih should have spent all that time to sit down with the Election Commission or SPR and discuss in great detail issues such as electoral boundaries, voter variation between seats, postal voting, and whatnot.

Instead they wasted their time trying to oust Prime Minister Najib Razak and replace him with Anwar Ibrahim.

Bersih is supposed to be about free and fair elections.

When we first launched Bersih in 2007, we made it very clear that all we wanted was free and fair elections.

We told the voters that we are not saying that they must vote opposition.

They can vote Barisan Nasional if they want to.

But it has to be on a level playing field.

Bersih was not supposed to be the fourth coalition member of Pakatan Harapan (or Pakatan Rakyat before this).

It was supposed to be above both Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Harapan, acting as a sort of third force.

But it is no longer a third force.

It is the fourth member of Pakatan Harapan.

This is not what we had intended in 2007 when Bersih was formed.

In 2007, both sides of the political divide, even those from Umno, supported Bersih.

Now many people hate the Yellow Shirts and see it as just another wing of Pakatan Harapan … Read More

Source: Malaysia Today

SHARE
Raja Petra Kamarudin or RPK, cousin to the Selangor Sultan, is one of Malaysia's earliest online 'citizen journalists'. He started his website in 1995 before the internet 'explosion' triggered by the Reformasi movement in September 1998. Malaysia Today was launched as a blog in August 2004 and is one of the few pioneer blogs still active and posting articles on a daily basis 24-7. RPK, 66 years old, has been writing since 1990.